Urban Morphology and Representation

NAME: URBAN MORPHOLOGY AND REPRESENTATION NETWORK

 

CONVENERS

Dr Fei Chen

Dr Fei ChenDepartment of Architecture, University of Liverpool

Dr Raymond Lucas

Dr Raymond LucasDepartment of Architecture, University of Edinburgh20 Chambers Street, Edinburgh, EH1 1JZUnited KingdomEmail: Raymond.p.lucas@btinternet.comTel: +44 (0)131 650 2306Fax: +44 (0)131 650 8019

Dr Ombretta Romice

Dr Ombretta RomiceDepartment of Architecture, University of Strathclyde131 Rottenrow, Glasgow, G4 0NGUnited KingdomEmail: ombretta.r.romice@strath.ac.ukTel: +44 (0)141 548 3006Fax: +44 (0)141 552 3997Web:http://www.strath.ac.uk/architecture/staff/romiceombrettadr/

  

MAIN AIMS/MISSION STATEMENT

The IAPS Urban Morphology and Representation Network is an interdisciplinary forum dedicated to advancing knowledge, practice, and education in relation to the form of the urban environment. It studies in particular urban space over time (from an evolutionary perspective and a perceptual one) and focuses on innovative representational techniques and technologies as means to better understand space. Given that designers engage with the urban environment through a variety of inscriptive and form-generating practices, there is a need for these techniques to respond to the field of people-environment studies.  The network aims to promote and facilitate the following activities:

 

  • Develop urban morphological studies in combination to People-Environment Studies;
  • Develop methods for the representation of urban spaces based on alternative modalities from the more traditional ones, such as psychological, non-visual sensory modalities, social patterns and more;
  • Research the connection between urban morphological studies and design practices and management;
  • Research the connection between sensory representation and design practices;
  • Open discussion of theoretical and methodological issues;
  • Consolidation, dissemination, and application of knowledge;
  • Innovation in research methods and environmental design practice;
  • Collaboration among researchers, planning authorities, designers, local residents and other interested practitioners from both Europe and Eastern Asia;
  • Education of new researchers and practitioners.

 

TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION among network members include the following:

  • The effects of aspects of inscriptive practices (drawing, sketching, notation, figure-ground representations) on the design of space;
  • The effects of temporal transformation of morphology on place-making;
  • The identification of types and typological processes of urban forms and their utility in design and planning policy;
  • The relationship between morphology and the experience of the environment;
  • The contribution of various morphological and phenomenological techniques (typology, drawing, notation, diagram, mapping, simulation) to environmental sustainability;
  • Visualising the invisible: representing the whole experience of space and place;
  • The utility of alternative forms of inscription in the design and research process;
  • The utility of morphological studies in the design process with user participation in particular;
  • Further understanding of traditional inscriptive practices;
  • Relationships between description and design;
  • Drawing as a collaborative practice, drawing as engagement, drawing as communication;

 

Members of the network are welcome from several academic disciplines and professions, including architecture (history, digital), urban design, psychology (architectural, community, conservation, environmental), urban planning, geography (particularly GIS and human geography) and environmental management.

 

The network will enhance opportunities for joint publication and research funding by facilitating better exploration of inter-disciplinary themes. Intended outcomes of the network are a reader on Morphological and Representational Studies; monographs on the application of morphological theories to both design practice and policy making in an Asian context; a Pattern Book of sensory notations on a number of contrasting cities: Tokyo, Boston, Rome, Jakarta and Nanjing.

 

A particular aim of this network will be to enhance the connection between research on urban morphology and space representation and practices in environmental design disciplines, in particular, architecture and urban design and to generate a wider set of design tools by encouraging the development of morphological analysis and representational practices in conjunction with researchers in social, psychological, and geographical disciplines.

 

 

MEMBERS LIST and AFFILIATIONS

Dr Fei ChenDepartment of Architecture, University of Liverpool  Dr Ray LucasDepartment of Architecture, University of Edinburgh20 Chambers Street, Edinburgh, EH1 1JZUnited KingdomEmail: Raymond.p.lucas@btinternet.comTel: +44 (0)131 650 2306Fax: +44 (0)131 650 8019
Dr Ombretta RomiceDepartment of Architecture, University of Strathclyde131 Rottenrow, Glasgow, G4 0NGUnited KingdomEmail: ombretta.r.romice@strath.ac.ukTel: +44 (0)141 548 3006Fax: +44 (0)141 552 3997Web:http://www.strath.ac.uk/architecture/staff/romiceombrettadr/

 

Dr Sergio PortaDepartment of Architecture, University of Strathclyde131 Rottenrow, Glasgow, G4 0NGUnited KingdomEmail: Sergio.porta@strath.ac.ukTel: +44 (0)141 548 3006Fax: +44 (0)141 552 3997Web: http://www.humanspacelab.com/
Dr. Wolfgang SonneTechnische Universität Dortmund, Fakultät Architektur, Städtebau und Bauingenieurwesen, Lehrstuhl Geschichte und Theorie der Architektur (GTA), August-Schmidt-Strasse 6, D-44221 Dortmund
Tel.: 0049-231-755 4197
Fax: 0049-231-755 4196
Web: http://www.bauwesen.uni-dortmund.de/gta/index.html
 

 

 

KEY DISCUSSION TOPICS

  • The relationship between urban morphology, representation and design;
  • Relationships between morphology and experiences of space with reference to a particular culture and history
  • The utility of morphological analysis and depicting the visual and non-visual experience of space;
  • Representing Temporality, resistant space, and the alternatives of score-based notations;
  • Methodological approaches relevant to the maintenance of cultural continuity, enhancing the sense of place, and the creation of human-friendly spaces.

 

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

 

Lucas, R. & Mair, G. (Eds.).  2008.  Sensory Urbanism Conference Proceedings 2008.  Edinburgh: Flâneur Press.

Lucas, R & Romice, O.  2008.  Representing Sensory Experience in Urban Design in Design Principles and Practices: an International Journal2, 83-94.

Chen, F. 2008. Typomorphology and the Crisis of Chinese Cities, in Urban Morphology, 12, 45-7

Lucas, R.  2009.  The Sensory Experience of Sacred Space: Senso-Ji and Meiji-Jingu, Tokyo in MONU: Magazine on Urbanism.  10, 46-55.

Chen, F. & Romice, O. (2009) Perserving the Cultural Identity of Chinese Cities in Urban Design through a Typomorphological Approach, in Urban Design International, 14, 36-54

Lucas, R.  2009.  Designing a Notation for the Senses in Architectural Theory Review Special Issue: Sensory Urbanism, Spring 2009 Issue.  Forthcoming.

Lucas, R. & Chen, F.  2009.  Sensory Notation Handbook.  Edinburgh: Flâneur Press.  Forthcoming.

Lucas, R. & Romice, O.  2009.  Assessing the Multi-Sensory Qualities of Urban Space in Medio Ambiente y Comportamiento Humano (MACH) Special Issue: Urban environment and Human Behaviour.  Forthcoming.

Lucas R with Mair, G & Romice, O.  2009.  Making Sense of the City: Representing Multi-Modality in Urban Space in Inns, T (Ed.), Designing for the 21st Century – Volume 2, Gower Publications. Forthcoming,

 

LINKS and RESOURCES

http://web.mac.com/raymond.p.lucas/Sensory_Urbanism/

http://web.mac.com/raymond.p.lucas/Multimodality/

http://web.me.com/raymond.p.lucas/Jakarta/Index.html

http://www.archipelagos.eu

http://www.urbanform.org

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS and NOTICES

The Sixteenth International Seminar on Urban Form (ISUF 2009), 4-7 September 2009, Guangzhou, China http://www.urbanform.org/sem/sem2009.html

 

IAPS 2010 Urban Morphology and Representation Network symposium, 2010

 

CURRENT RESEARCH ACTIVITY

  • ‘Multimodal Representation of Urban Space’. The research project was funded by the UK Art & Humanities Research Council and the Environmental & Physical Sciences Research Council under their ‘Designing for the 21st Century’ scheme. The aim of the project was to look into the visual bias of existing urban design practices, and to consider the entire sensory experience of such environments as a key element in representation and design. Outcome of the work was a representational system for understanding and recording the sensory data of urban space with an eye towards the design process itself

 

  • Community participation in urban regeneration, urban design education, urban morphology, identity in the built environment, and other topics part of the Urban Design Research Unit at the University of Strathclyde.

 

  • ‘Cultures of Legibility’.  This research project is funded by the UK Arts & Humanities Research Council, and is a detailed study of the legibility and illegibility of Jakarta.  The project is a collaboration between the departments of Geography and Architecture at the University of Edinburgh, in partnership with the University of Indonesia.  Researchers in Jakarta have collected 100 video interviews with mental maps, and a further 1000 questionnaires detailing the everyday experience of this complex, spontaneously urbanising region. The transect we are working with exposes the complexity of this emergent city, with gated communities, traditional markets, golf clubs, rice paddies, and theme parks all occupying the same
    territory.  The narrative and interview data is being used to produce Kevin Lynch style maps as a critique of this form of mapping, with new dynamic forms of representation posited as the solution to mapping Jakarta.

 

 

URBAN MORPHOLOGY and REPRESENTATION GALLERY

Figure 1: A contemporary residential compound in Nanjing, China

Figure 2: A traditional residential compound (dating back to the 18th C) in Suzhou, China

Figure 3: The skyline of Nanjing perceived from the bank of Xuanwu Lake to the north of the city

Figure 4: Three sample notation diagrams on Pantheon, Rome

 

FORTHCOMING CONFERENCES and SEMINARS

IAPS 2010 Urban Morphology and Representation Network symposium, 2010

 

NOTES FROM PREVIOUS MEETINGS

 

GALLERY